The Art of Making a Connection

marketing tips for coaches and consultants
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Invoking an emotional response within prospective and current customers is a delicate craft, not a hard science. You can analyze your market and have the demographics in front of you, but if you don’t tap into your own creativity and empathy, chances are good your web copy will be weaker for it.

Here’s why:

You don’t want to make your prospects cringe: Bad or outdated website copy is enough to send your prospects scrambling for another site. Potential customers want to see that a company they’re purchasing from is fresh, up-to-date, and always growing and evolving.


If your web copy is stale and neglected, you will not make a positive emotional connection with the prospect. Instead, they will question your credibility—after all, if your website is not important enough for you to invest your time and care in, how would a client be any different?

Web copy should facilitate an emotional response in the viewer—something that connects the reader to your product or service. If your website copy is an inaccurate representation of your brand, you run a great risk of repelling future customers and even past customers.

You don’t want to anger your prospects: Well-written web copy can have a powerful influence on your prospects’ purchasing behavior.

The goal of your website is to signal prospects to take an action, move to purchase, or to contact you. Web copy and design work hand in hand to ensure this process is smooth and stress-free for prospects. Poorly written web copy that is difficult to navigate will surely frustrate or anger your potential customers and influence them to leave your website, rather than take the action you intended.

Your website should take visitors through a joyful experience that ignites a positive emotion within them and either encourages them to take an action or visit your website again and again.

For example, think of your favorite websites. Why do you enjoy visiting these sites? You must find happiness in the experience you have on these websites or else you probably wouldn’t visit them again and again. Right? This is exactly how your website should act if you want to keep prospects and customers visiting and purchasing.

You don’t want to confuse your prospects: Let’s say you own a coaching business that specializes in work-from-home businesses. Anna is looking for a coach who will help her at-home business grow and generate a consistent source of income. She reads two trusted, positive reviews for the same company. Both of the company referrers exclaim this coaching business changed their entire lives and they happily live off the revenue generated by their massively successful at-home start-ups. But when Anna visits the company’s website, the web copy does not imply any benefits for her, there is no obvious contact information, and the logo looks generic. Unfortunately this company’s website and marketing materials aren’t in line with the brand message and portray an inaccurate image to the now disappointed entrepreneur.

You can bet Anna is fairly confused based on the referrals she received versus the website copy and design. She was envisioning something much more professional and approachable than what the website conveyed. Likely, she will look for a business whose brochure, website, logo, and personality are in line with her needs and desires.

The lesson learned is to always remember that it’s the whole package you’re selling to prospects. Your website should take them through an experience and be a pleasure—not a stressful, disheartening venture through poorly written copy, outdated material, and confusing navigation.


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Michelle Salater

http://www.sumercopywriting.com

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